Towards Thriving Cover

August 31, 2017

Domestic Violence Awareness Month Poster 2017 As October’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month approaches, we want to provide you with any information needed for your awareness and action events. Here’s an updated Domestic Violence Fact Sheet and the 2017 Idaho Intimate Partner Related Fatalities (2001-2017), which indicates 15 related fatalities (homicides of direct and indirect victims as well as suicides).

As part of our ongoing efforts to highlight the risk factors of dangerousness and indicators of lethality in domestic violence, the Idaho Coalition contracted with Boise State University Criminal Justice Department last year to conduct a study of the Idaho Risk Assessment of Dangerousness. The Idaho Risk Assessment of Dangerousness was developed ten years ago through the Idaho Coalition in partnership with key stakeholders in the criminal justice system and community domestic violence providers. Idaho law enforcement, prosecution and judicial systems as well as community-based advocates have been using this tool to inform survivors of their risk of future harm as well as indicators of lethality as part of safety planning. The tool has also been used to assess the level of intervention needed by the criminal justice system to enhance safety and by the courts to determine conditions of release. An unexpected use of the tool has been in civil domestic violence cases in the determination of issuance of civil protection orders and for custody decisions.

We will be releasing the initial study of the Idaho Risk Assessment of Dangerousness in October which found that the “overall IRAD risk score appears to be a significant predictor of future intimate partner violence behavior.” As part of the state-wide release, we will host a webinar Idaho Risk Assessment of Dangerousness Significant Predictor of Future Harm on Monday, October 16th at 2:00 PM MT/1:00 PM PT with Lisa Bostaph, Ph.D., one of the authors of the study. Register for the webinar here.

As part of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we have created a poster for domestic violence programs to distribute in your communities to law enforcement, prosecutors, health care providers (hospitals and clinics), to increase awareness of the risk factors for future harm as well as the lethality factors. Please let us know if your program would like individualized posters with your program logo in lieu of the Idaho Coalition logo as well as your local hotline number by providing the information and your logo here.

Finally, we have two community domestic and sexual violence programs with a change in leadership this summer – Safe Passages and Oneida Crisis Center.

We want to recognize the contributions of Katie Coker as Executive Director of Safe Passages in Coeur d’Alene for two years and as a member of our board. Katie resigned her position at the end of June and now has a grant writing consulting business. Katie was able to stabilize and grow Safe Passages, and leaves a thriving program for new executive director Chauntelle Lieske. Welcome Chauntelle!

We also want to recognize the contributions of Carol Caulford, Executive Director of Oneida Crisis Center in Malad. Carol served as executive director for twelve years and was long-standing member of the board. Carol is retiring at the end of this month. Carol has been a leader in our state in creating new and innovative ways of reaching community members in rural communities – from creating space and resources for expectant mothers to hosting large picnics in the community park to increasing resources by collaborating with regional domestic violence community and tribal programs in successful federal grants. Carol was also a master at grant writing and had a strength for details that will be missed in her community and on our board. Thank you Carol for your many years of services to survivors and your gift of friendship to so many of us.

We Choose All of Us,
 

Kelly

Carol Caulford Retires and Holly Llewellyn Takes the Helm at Oneida Crisis Center

Twelve years ago, Carol joined a tiny organization as the one paid staff person. Oneida Crisis Center was a grass roots organization with only a 10 x 13 foot room for emergency shelter in Oneida County’s old hospital. Carol’s tiny office was next door, with a half bathroom shared by the clients and herself. Residents had to bathe out of the sink.

Fast forward to today. A beautiful shelter home on an acre of land, with room for animals and families, and a dedicated staff and volunteer base. Prevention work, outreach and support services, and a brand new 780 square foot food pantry on the property have developed under Carol’s leadership. The food pantry grand opening will be soon, as they finish up final details. Because they will serve the surrounding community, many more underserved people who are experiencing violence will have a link not only to food, but to support services. This new venture with providing food assistance will also be a bridge to safety and support.

Carol wants to sneak out quietly -” fade quietly into the night”, she says. It is a life transition full of opportunities and blessings, as well as the grief that goes with closing such an important chapter in life. Carol’s life WAS this work, and was truly “her baby”. Those who have known her understand that her 19 hour a week job was closer to 70 hours, and that she transformed her own personal tragedy into building a program and network of support for hundreds of survivors and their families.

Carol also had the good sense to hire Holly Llewellyn a few years ago, who’s advocate position is now being replaced so she can lead the Oneida Crisis Center into the future. We welcome Holly as the new Executive Director of OCC! Holly embraces the challenge and responsibility that being an ED will bring, and continuing to grow meaningful services in their community.

Holly is invested in reaching more isolated senior community members, with special food boxes. They expect to see a 15-20% increase in disclosures of abuse through their outreach. They also continue their commitment to rural youth, and building and sustaining model practices.

Carol will step away August 31 – and will relish in down time to enjoy her loved ones and be more active. Swimming, reading and family time will help her glide into retirement in style, and in health. Holly promises to keep those steps up on her Fit Bit to maintain a healthy work-life balance and is passionate about her new administrative role. She is grateful that Carol has left a solid organization as her legacy, and Carol is grateful to leave that legacy in such capable hands.

Congratulations to Carol and Holly! We wish you the absolute best!!

ReplyASAP

Woman texting imageA new app called ReplyASAP has recently been featured on Good Morning America and Fox News. The app states “Not certain if your messages are being heard and seen? Be certain, send them an ASAP. Reply ASAP allows you to send messages to people you’ve connect with via the App. The message will appear on their phone over whatever they are doing, and make a noise until they interact with it, even if the phone is on silent. You will then get notification that it has been read”.

The app is advertised for parents who are frustrated with their children’ not answering their phone or message. However, it also has the potential to be utilized by someone who is engaging in domestic violence or stalking behavior. It is easy to envision a person engaged in stalker behavior send numerous texts via the app to the individual being stalked. Even if the phone is on silent, the alarm would still sound indicating there is a message via the Reply ASAP app. And while both individuals need to have the app installed on their phone, we know individuals in domestic violence relationships have little control over what the abusive person may install on their phone.

You can find out more about ReplyASAP here: http://www.replyasap.co.uk/. For now the app is only available on Droids and not other devices.

For more information on the use of technologies to stalk, please contact Jennifer Landhuis or check out the Stalking Resource Center’s Use of Technology to Stalk class. It is free and provides informative information about safety planning with survivors. The National Network to End Domestic Violence Tech Safety App is also a fantastic resource.

Transitional Housing and Back to School

An image of an apple on top of a stack of booksBack to school – it’s a time of transition, and it can impact the families we work with in multiple ways. Needless to say, it can be stressful! Changes in routine, messed up sleep, coordinating new schedules, excitement (including wound up kids!), anxiety, and additional expenses are just a few common experiences.

One way we can help ease the minds or reduce some financial stress for the hardworking parents who are receiving transitional housing funds through us, is to give a little more assistance this time of year.

A little extra help with rent and utilities can mean clothing and supplies that children need without increased financial stress. It can mean an activity that children may not otherwise be able to participate in. It can mean healthier food – or even ENOUGH food. Learning and growing create big appetites!

Advocates are awesome at thinking outside the box to support families healing from domestic and sexual violence. Providing additional financial assistance during school transitions is one more way to support them. If you’re not sure that funds are available to you to do this, please reach out to Melissa Ruth at 208-841-1704 or melissa@engagingvoices.org.

Training & Events

Idaho Risk Assessment of Dangerousness Webinar

Wednesday, October 16, 2017 • 2:00 PM MT • 1:00 PM PT
The Idaho Risk Assessment of Dangerousness was developed ten years ago through the Idaho Coalition in partnership with key stakeholders in the criminal justice system and community domestic violence providers. Idaho law enforcement, prosecution and judicial systems as well as community-based advocates have been using this tool to inform survivors of their risk of future harm as well as indicators of lethality as part of safety planning. The tool has also been used to assess the level of intervention needed by the criminal justice system to enhance safety and by the courts to determine conditions of release. An unexpected use of the tool has been in civil domestic violence cases in the determination of issuance of civil protection orders and for custody decisions.

An initial study of the Idaho Risk Assessment of Dangerousness recently conducted by Boise State University found that the “overall IRAD risk score appears to be a significant predictor of future intimate partner violence behavior.”

Join us for a discussion regarding the use of IRAD in your communities.


SAVE THE DATES: Regional Learning Communities – Fall 2017

Learning communities will be held in the following communities:

  • October 23rd: Eastern Idaho Regional Learning Community – Pocatello
  • October 24th: Southwest Idaho Regional Learning Community – Boise
  • October 25th: Northern Idaho Regional Learning Community – Coeur d’Alene

Please register here and help inform our agenda.


SAVE DATE: Idaho Coalition Bi-Annual Conference

November 28-29, 2017 * Boise State University * Boise, ID

Idaho Coalition Store Materials

Engaging Voices Website StoreReminder that shipping for all material orders made by Programs on the Idaho Coalition website store is FREE of cost, please use the below coupon for all orders.

Visit the online store to view current Idaho Coalition materials available for order. For store questions, please contact Lacey Sinn.

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