Compassionate Communities: We Choose All of Us Website Header Compassionate Communities: We Choose All of Us Date and Location header

Workshop Descriptions

Tuesday, November 28th • 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.


10:45 – 12:00: MORNING WORKSHOPS

Belonging to Beloved Community Track

  • Emergent Strategy Facilitation – adrienne maree brown, co-editor of Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction from Social Justice Movements and author of Emergent Strategy – Shaping Change, Changing Worlds

    Learn how to apply emergent strategy as a facilitator – assessment, tools and practice guaranteed. There may also be magic.

  • Restoring Wholeness, Our Spirit, and Our Humanity Track

  • Falling Through the Cracks: How Girls Are Being Married in Idaho Today – Archi Pyati, JD, Chief of Policy and Programs, Tahirih Justice Center

    Thousands of children are being married in America each year, including right here in Idaho. The majority of child marriages are of girls to men sometimes decades older than they are. How can this be happening today? Laws governing age of marriage, determined by each state, allow girls to be married, and a complex web of rules and institutions can make it nearly impossible for girls seeking to avoid or flee a marriage to get help. This workshop will shine a light on the previously overlooked problem of child marriage, with a particular focus on Idaho.

  • Together We Are Stronger Track

  • Enhancing Meaningful Access to Services for Individuals with Limited English Proficiency – Rosie Hidalgo, JD, Senior Director of Public Policy, Casa De Esperanza

    Ensuring meaningful language access to services is critical for the life and safety of survivors with limited English proficiency (LEP). Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, recipients of federal funding are required to take reasonable steps to ensure that LEP individuals have meaningful access to their services. In this workshop, we will review the federal policies regarding language access rights and discuss strategies to enhance language access in programs for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. We will also discuss advocacy strategies to address language access as part of a coordinated community response, including in the courts and law enforcement. Additionally, we will provide tools and resources to help organizations develop language access plans and enhance accessibility. The workshop will be interactive and include video vignettes as a training resource.

  • Practices of Cultural Competency and Access for LGBTQ Survivors of Violence – Andrew St. Ana, JD, Director of Legal Services, Day One

    Description to be announced

  • Relationship Building as a Practice – A Case for the Community-Development of Service Providers when Relationship-Building is Prioritized – Toni Brinegar, Program Specialist, Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities, Mario Pile, Admissions Counselor, Idaho Youth ChalleNGe Academy, and Donna Shines, Executive Director, The Mentoring Network, Inc.

    Description to be announced

  • Building Bridges with Refugee Communities – Heidi Lehmann

    This workshop is grounded in the presenters’ years of experience in direct services, programming and research with refugees from Syria, Burma, Iraq, Sierra Leone, Sudan, South Sudan, and the Congo. The Presenter will share her experience working with refugees to design community driven interventions in different countries, to keep women and girls safe, and to support survivors. Through a combination of presentation and interactive dialogue participants will explore how community interventions fit into the current infrastructure of Domestic Violence prevention and response in the United States.


  • 1:30 – 2:45: AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

    Belonging to Beloved Community Track

  • Hearing their Voices: The Persistence of Violence Against Native American Women and Girls, Understanding the Past to Address the Present – Patina Park, JD, Executive Director of the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center

    Violence against Native women and girls has been part of the history of this continent since first contact. The legal, social, and moral history with Indigenous women and girls in this country has cultivated a modern environment where 1 in 3 Native American women are raped in their lifetime and are 2.5 times more likely to be raped than women in general in the United States. Jurisdictional difficulties also exist in a state/tribal/federal system which make prosecution and ensuring safety extremely difficult. This workshop will show how the past has framed the way dominant culture views Native women and girls in modern times, how it is connected to violence, and will argue that until the United States reconciles the violent history with the Indigenous people and fixes the jurisdictional gaps in Indian Country, violence against Indigenous women and girls will only continue.

  • We Choose All of Us: Coming Together as Beloved Community – Chelsea Gaona Lincoln, Toni Brinegar, Jennifer Martinez

    Learn ways of coming together as a beloved community that will embody, act, and take risks for a world for All Of U s. Explore how to tap into the hunger to generate a culture that interrupts violence and domination and generates life-affirming ways of being that center liberation, equity, wholeness, and our interconnectedness to the very last girl.

  • Together We Are Stronger Track

  • Enhanced Safety Planning for Immigrant Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence – Archi Pyati, JD, Chief of Policy and Programs, Tahirih Justice Center, and Rosie Hidalgo, JD, Senior Director of Public Policy, Casa De Esperanza

    Abusers often use the threat of immigration enforcement as a way to maintain power and control and to make victims less likely to seek protection. For this reason, it is important for advocates to understand how to: help immigrant survivors become aware of their rights; identify special immigration remedies for victims, including special VAWA provisions around confidentiality; and prepare enhanced safety plans for immigrant survivors. This training will also provide updates on recent immigration policy developments and new enforcement measures that impact immigrant survivors.

  • Removing Roadblocks: Understanding the Challenges and Opportunities in the Muslim Community for Survivor Healing – Sameera Qureshi, Director of Sexuality Education & Training, HEART Women & Girls, and Nadiah Mohajir, Founder and Executive Director, HEART Women & Girls

    In light of sexual assault allegations in numerous Muslim communities, there is a dire need for open conversations about sexual abuse, in a way that empowers survivors to seek healing and justice. This session will explore the following questions: What are the unique challenges facing Muslim communities in reporting sexual assault? What does victim-blaming look like in the Muslim community? How can we provide more culturally competent victim centric services?

  • Practices of Cultural Competency and Access for LGBTQ Survivors of Violence – Andrew St. Ana, JD, Director of Legal Services, Day One

    Description to be announced.

  • Title and description to be announced – Mel Leviton

Wednesday, November 29th • 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m


10:45 – 12:00: MORNING WORKSHOPS

Belonging to Beloved Community Track

  • The Story of Me – Sonya Rosario, Executive Director and founder of the Women of Color Alliance (WOCA), and Nancy Egan, Shoshone Paiute Tribal member and former Chairwoman of Duck Valley Indian Reservation

    What’s the story? How does it impact you and the work you do in your community, and how can we create community and a support system for ourselves in our communities? Out of the story comes, courage and strength. The objective of this workshop is that we are never alone on this journey and there are many who came before us, as there will be many who will come after us. How do you play a role in assisting them in creating a safe community? We specifically address language (Example: my fear is … to, my concerns are).

  • Restoring Wholeness, Our Spirit, and Humanity Track

  • Secret Survivors & Mirror Memoirs: Using Stories to End Child Sexual Abuse – Amita Swadhin, Founder and Director, Mirror Memoirs

    Participants will view a 40-minute film by Ping Chong & Company based on a 2009-2012 collaboration between the facilitator and the off-off-Broadway group, and will learn how storytelling can help survivors, advocates and direct service providers build a frame to help people understand child sexual abuse.

  • Removing Roadblocks: Understanding the Challenges & Opportunities in the Muslim Community for Institutional Change – Sameera Qureshi, Director of Sexuality Education and Training, HEART Women & Girls, and Nadiah Mohajir, Founder and Executive Director, HEART Women & Girls

    Building off the prior workshop, this presentation will focus on how mainstream and faith institutions can work together to address roadblocks facing Muslim survivors on a systemic level. How can we remove barriers to reporting? How do we build bridges and partnerships between mainstream and faith institutions? What is gendered Islamophobia and how does it create further roadblocks to survivor healing in the Muslim community?

  • White Fragility – Robin DiAngelo, PhD, Lecturer, University of Washington School of Social Work

    White people in the U.S. live in a racially insular social environment. Even when individual white people do not live primarily in segregation, the wider context reflects, affirms, and insulates us. This insulation builds our expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering our stamina for enduring racial stress. I term this lack of racial stamina “White Fragility.” White Fragility is a state in which even a minimal challenge to the white position becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves including: argumentation, invalidation, silence, withdrawal and claims of being attacked and misunderstood. These moves function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and maintain white control. This session will provide an overview of white fragility, identify how white fragility functions, and explore the perspectives and skills needed for white people to build their racial stamina and develop more constructive cross-racial practices.

  • Together We Are Stronger Track

  • Working with Survivors Who Have Disabilities – Vanessa Sapien, Senior Program Officer/Clinician, Just Detention International

    This workshop will focus on the marginalization of people living with disabilities and the contributing factors of sexual abuse through a cultural lens.

  • Ayudando Sobrevivientes: Una Conversación Sobre Estrategias y Recursos para Ayudar la Comunidad Latina en Idaho (Helping Survivors: A Conversation on Strategies and Resources for Serving the Latinx Community in Idaho) – Estefania Mondragon, Bilingual Social Change Associate, Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence, and panel.

    Description to be announced.


  • 1:30 – 2:45: AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

    Belonging to Beloved Community Track

  • Intersectional Invisibility: Losing Sight of Purpose in the Need to Identify and Report – Patina Park, JD, Executive Director of the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center

    The demand to identify and subsequently serve the multiple layers of identity that exist in our clients is a goal for many service providers working with victims of violence. The need to address this intersectionality in our approach to working with individuals is a struggle as it can require expertise in multiple areas, and contains pressure from funders to record and report everything. This workshop will argue that in our urge to identify everything, we can lose sight of the most important goal of working with those impacted by trauma, their humanity

  • Restoring Wholeness, Our Spirit, and Humanity Track

  • Working with Survivors Who Have Disabilities – Vanessa Sapien, Senior Program Officer/Clinician, Just Detention International

    This workshop will focus on the marginalization of people living with disabilities and the contributing factors of sexual abuse through a cultural lens.

  • Healing Through the Arts: Tapping into Creative Energy to Release, Regenerate and Reconnect – Leta Neustaedter, LCSW, Founder, Metamorphosis Performing Arts Studio, LLC

    We all have creative energy within us. Some have honed it and use it daily, others may feel they got ripped off when the creativity tokens were handed out, most people fall somewhere in between. But we’ve ALL got creative energy and when we are feeling depleted (physically, emotionally, spiritually, morally), tapping into our individual form of creativity can be a life saver. This workshop will explore how to find it, use it, and share it with others to heal ourselves and strengthen our community. It’s not about whether you’re “good” at it, it’s all about whether the creative process helped you feel better.

  • Preventing Burnout – Kim Camacho, LMSW, Violence Prevention and Support Coordinator, Gender Equity Center at Boise State University

    What are the warning signs of burnout? How can it be prevented and healed? Discuss self-care practices that will help prevent burnout in your workplace and personal life.

  • Together We Are Stronger Track

  • The Refugee Journey and Men – Heidi Lehmann

    The presenter has been working with men in conflict and refugee settings since 2003. The resettlement process is long and exposes all family members to new gender norms and expectations. As a way on ensure that refugee women and girls are safe from domestic violence, domestic violence practitioners and Resettlement Agencies should explore ways to design prevention interventions for recently resettled men. During this session, the presenter will encourage participants to reflect on the assumptions they may have about the men who are being resettled from different countries to the US. The presenter will share her experience with a trauma informed intervention designed for men that has been used in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Iraq, Thailand and Democratic Republic of Congo. The intervention will explore how transformational work with men must be guided by dual principles of support and accountability.

  • Migrant Farmworkers Crossing Borders Project – Gabriela Alor

    Description to be announced.

  • Earth is Sacred, Water is Life Track

  • Native Advocacy and Activist Storytelling – Judith LeBlanc

    Description to be announced.